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TWELFTH GENERATION

3648. * William Stickney (2722) was born in 1592 in Frampton, Lincolnshire England.(2723) He was baptized on SEP 6 1592 in Frampton, Lincolnshire England. (2724) *Stickney Family: "in St. Mary's Church" He emigrated in 1637 from Hull, Yorkshire Co., England.(2725) *Stickney Family: "Mr. Savage, in his Genealogical Dictionary, gives his "having come probably the year preceding, from Hull, in Yorkshire," that is in 1637, which is probably correct, as the first information obtained of him here, is from the records of the First Church in Boston, the Rev. John Wilson's, to which were admitted: "The 6t of ye 11th moneth 1638..."
He immigrated in 1637 to Boston, MA.(2726) *Stickney Family: "Mr. Savage, in his Genealogical Dictionary, gives his "having come probably the year preceding, from Hull, in Yorkshire," that is in 1637, which is probably correct, as the first information obtained of him here, is from the records of the First Church in Boston, the Rev. John Wilson's, to which were admitted: "The 6t of ye 11th moneth 1638..."
He died in JAN 1665 in Rowley, MA.(2727) 9th great grandfather

*Stickney Family: "WILLIAM STICKNEY, the first settler, was the ancestor of nearly all who have since borne that name in America. It is inferred from records procured in England for the author, by Horatio G. Somerby, Esq., that he was the William, who is mentioned as baptized in St. Mary's Church, Frampton, Lincolnshire, England, September 6, 1592, and the son of WILLIAM STICKNEY of Frampton, who was baptized December 30, 1558, and married, June 16, 1585, Margaret Peirson, and the grandson of ROBERT STICKNEY of Frampton, who made his will October 3, and was buried October 18, 1582.
Frampton is a parish in the wapentake of Kirton, parts of Holland, county of Lincoln, England, three and one-fourth miles south from Boston. The church is dedicated to St. Mary. It is a fine old stone edifice, an engraving of which is in the possession of the author. The parish register of this church contains many records of baptisms, marriages and burials of Stickney's from 1558 to 1609. The name does not appear on these records after this date.
Traditions and information obtained in England render it probable that the family removed to Hull, or its vicinity. I learn from Mrs. Sarah Ellis, of Rose Hill, near London, England (formerly Miss Sarah Stickney, an authoress of some repute in England and America), that "The old family residence was at Ridgmont, a beautiful place about nine miles east of Hull, where my father and his forefathers, for many generations had lived, hospitably and honorably, keeping almost open house in a large mansion, and receiving guests from all countries, who generally found something to learn, or at least to interest, in my father's great practical knowledge and scientific pursuits, and where he died in 1848, aged 85 years."
The surnames of the first emigrants to New England were derived from various sources. Those considered most ancient and respectable, were derived from places, cities and towns, as in almost every case they existed in England, long before the use of surnames.
In the county of Lincoln is situated the parish of Stickney, from which the family derived its surname. "Stickney is a large village on the Boston road, distant eight and a half miles north of Boston station, three from New Bolingbrook and eight miles south-west of Spilsby; it is pleasantly situated on the borders of the East and West Fens, in the soke of Bolingbroke, Union of Spilsby, Lindsey division, and diocese of Lincoln. The living is a rectory, value £356, in the patronage and incumbency of the Rev. George Coltman. The church is dedicated to St. Luke, is a handsome building in the early English style; it consists of a lofty tower containing four bells, nave, aisles, and chancel and antique porch. The Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists have each a chapel. A school for the education of the poor was endowed, in 1678, by one William Lovell, who demised land at Winthrope, which produces a rental of £95 per year, together with two acres at Stickney, let for £5 per year. The master, Jonathan Adams, has a house, and an usher to assist in teaching the children. The population in 1841 was 895; the area in acres, including the Fen allotment, is 2,050; rateable value £3,629. Robert Cracroft, Esq., is lord of the manor. The charities amount to about £43 a year, for the benefit of the poor. It has navigation to Boston." [From the Post Office Directory of Lincolnshire, England, 1849.]
Mr. Robert Stickney of New York City, while in Boston, England, in the spring of 1868, was called upon by an aged gentleman of the name of Stickney, who, struck by the similarity of name, and learning that he was from the United States, invited him to his house (built one hundred and fifty years before), in the place of Stickney, near by. He there saw the Coat of Arms of the family, and the gentleman gave him a view of the old Moat House, and the following information in his own handwriting, which he forwarded to me, May 26, 1868.
"This chantry was attached to the Guild of Saint Lawrence, the above represents the last portion of the building, it was called the Moat House and was taken down in 1836. The chantry was founded in 1362 in the parish of Leak near Boston. The walls of the Moat House were of stone and of great strength. On the chimney piece of one of the chambers were four shields, one of them quartering the arms of Hunston, Sutton, Stickney, Whiting, Gedney and Enderby. The other bore the arms of Hunston, Sutton, Stickney, Whiting, impaling those of Smith of Elsham. Various remains of gilding and ornamental work, showed that the room had been very handsomely got up."
"In the reign of Edward III, 1331, one hundred and thirty-one persons are taxed in Boston, of whom John de Tumby paid £4, the highest charge; among the names of the others, is John de Stickney, who paid about £1, a large sum in those days. This John de Stickney, or one of his family, was probably a member of the Guild of Saint Lawrence, from the Arms of Stickney being carved on the chimneypiece. [Extracted from the History of Boston and the neighborhood.]"
This gentleman expressed his belief that both the American family and his own, were connections, and derived their name and origin from the same source, and it is hoped that hereafter a fuller account of WILLIAM STICKNEY and his ancestors, than can be given from the scanty materials now obtained, may be procured.
At what time WILLIAM STICKNEY married, the surname of his wife, where he resided in England, and the date of the births or baptisms of his children, the name of the ship in which he embarked, as tradition says, at Hull, or the time of his arrival in Boston, New England, have not been ascertained.
His son Samuel, in a deposition in 1698, names some of the passengers with them, who settled in Rowley, but nothing further.
Mr. Savage, in his Genealogical Dictionary, gives his "having come probably the year preceding, from Hull, in Yorkshire," that is in 1637, which is probably correct, as the first information obtained of him here, is from the records of the First Church in Boston, the Rev. John Wilson's, to which were admitted:
"The 6t of ye 11th moneth 1638
WILLYAM STICKNEY, a husbandman &
Elizabeth his wife,
Margaret Crosse a Widdowe
Michaell Hopkinson servant to our brother Jacob Elyott &
Richard Swanne a husbandman"
"The 24th day of ye 9th Moneth 1639
Our brethren Mr. Henry Sandys, WILLYAM STICKNEY, Richard Swanne & Michaell Hopkinson by ye Churches Silence were dismissed to ye gathering of a Church at Rowley if the Lord so please."
He and his wife Elizabeth and three children, Samuel, Amos and Mary (who were probably baptized in England), were among the original settlers of Rowley, Mass. This place was settled in the year 1639, a division of the land was not made till the year 1643, when a survey of the town was taken by Thomas Nelson, Mr. Edward Carleton, Humphrey Reyner and Francis Parrot; streets were then laid out and named, and house lots assigned to its sixty original settlers, varying in size from one and a half, to six acres. The land otherwise not appropriated, was termed Commons, and every one and a half acre house lot was entitled to one and a half gates, or cow-rights, and other lands were laid out in the same proportion as these rights bore to the house lots.
There was laid out "On Wethersfield Streete, To WILLIAM STICKNEY one lott containinge one acre and a halfe, bounded on the west side by James Barker's house lott, and the highway, part of it lyinge on the north side of the streete, and part of it on the south side".
Here he erected a house, on the corner of Bradford and Wethersfield Streets, a little westerly of where the late Deacon Nathaniel Mighill's house now stands, 1868.
In his will, dated Jan. 21, 1664, it was conveyed by him to his wife Elizabeth, during her natural life; after her decease to go to his son John, he paying the legacies, &c.
Lieut. John Stickney, his son, in his will, dated Feb. 26, 1708-9, gave the homestead to his wife Hannah, with power to sell a wood-lot, towards the finishing of a new house, after her decease to go to his children.
Samuel Stickney, his son, in his will dated Feb. 15, 1753, conveyed the homestead to his wife Susannah, after her decease to be divided to his sons.
The portion which his son Moses Stickney, by inheritance and purchase of the other heirs, possessed of the ancient homestead, was conveyed in his will, dated April 5, 1792, to his wife Sarah; on her decease or marriage, to daughter Hannah, who died the widow of Joseph Kilborn, Sept. 19, 1853, at the age of ninety years. A part of the estate now (1868) remains in the possession of her niece, Mrs. Sarah (Stickney) Vinton.
The original settlers of Rowley, as Governor Winthrop writes in his Journal, "were godly men, and most of them of good estate," as will be shown by the fact that WILLIAM STICKNEY, our ancestor, and one of these settlers, brought with him, from his native land, a quarto copy of King James' translation of the Bible, first edition, printed 1611. This Bible has descended from father to son, in the same line as the old homestead, to Josiah Stickney, a brother of Mrs. Kilborn. He left it to his son, Deacon Nathaniel Stickney of Dracut, Mass., who now owns it in good preservation. This Bible was used at the celebration of the two hundredth anniversary of the settlement of Rowley. The most ancient half-way covenant (as it used to be called), of any that could be found in the town, and various names and dates are written in it. [See Gage's History of Rowley, p. 458.]
"On the seventh of October 1640, Mr. Samu. Dudley, Josias Cobbitt, Edmond Gardner, James Barcker, Henry Sands, Rob't Hunter and WILLI : STICKNEY, were admitted Freemen." [Colonial Records.]
WILLIAM STICKNEY was a member of an important committee in 1652, to draw up "a covenant and agreement" between the town of Rowley and the first settlers of the Merrimack lands, now Bradford. [See Rowley Records.] He was Clerk of the Market, and on Jury of Trials in 1653, Selectman 1656 and 1661, also in 1661styled Lieutenant.
The ancient possession books of Rowley, contain frequent grants of land to him, but the amount to which he and his sons became entitled in the right of their freeholds, and the offices they held, in consequence of the loss of a part of the early business records of the town, is unknown. There was granted to him, land in "Bradford Streete field," "Batcheler's Meadow," "Rough Meadow," "Hawk Meadow," and "Pollipod field."
February 16, 1661, "Voted that WILLIAM STICKNEY have the Gate on the Common laid out to him in the Rate of thirty shillings a Gate."
"At a legal town meeting in Rowley, November 26, 1662, voted that Richard Swan, Sam'l Brockelbank, Ezekiel Northend, John Pickard and WILLIAM STICKNEY should lay out sundry lots of land," one of which was "to WILLIAM STICKNEY on east side of Long Hill."
"Richard Swan, WILLIAM STICKNEY, and William Jackson, were appointed by the town in 1662, to sell Trees in the Town street to such as design them to stand for use against their houses or lands."
"Feb'y 25th 1661-2, The Selectmen for the present year Richard Swan, John Dresser, Thomas Tenney, Abel Longley, John Brocklebank, being empowered by the Towne for to Let or to dispose of the land that Mr. Rogers gave for the use of the Ministry. They have accordingly disposed of the same for the term of seven years as followeth. Imp's. To WILLIAM STICKNEY and Samuel Stickney the one half of the land, upland and meadow, they to pay £4 rent by the year to be paid in Corne for the use of the minyestry and to be paid when the rates are paid, they are to put on land twenty loads of Manure during the terme of 7 years and to make and maintain the fences."
In a Tax List dated between 1660 and 1664, of an amount of £46, 8s. 2d., his quota was 19s. 4d., and the whole number of persons taxed was thirty-five.
March 1, 1660, WILLIAM STICKNEY and wife Elizabeth, of Rowley, sold to Jeremiah Elsworth, of the same town, land in Rowley, which they acknowledged, March 17, 1663, before Samuel Symonds. [Essex Deeds, 2:186.]
May 27, 1662, he with wife Elizabeth and of Rowley, "for four pounds convey to James Barker of the same Town all that our proportion of land layd out to us in the land commonly called Merrimacke land being by estimation forty acres, be it more or less, with the preveledges belonging thereto, as it lyeth bounded by land of the sayed James Barker on the west, the east syde bounded by land of William Seales the northend butting on Merrimack river, the southend butting on Common land or the vilage line." Wit. Sam'l Brocklebanke and Jachin Reyner. Ack. July 22, 1662, before Samuel Symonds. [Ibid, 2:165.]
May 27, 1662. He buys of William Scales and Ann his wife of Rowley, their proportion of land laid out to them "in land commonly called Merrimack land being 40 acres, bounded by land laid out to WILLIAM STICKNEY on ye west, on east by land laid out to Lieut. John Remington now Peter Nash's, south end on village line, north on Merrimack River" &c. Wit. Sam'l Brocklebanke and James Barker. Ack. July 22, 1662, before Sam'l Symonds. [Ibid, 67:185.]
In 1660, he, with James Baley, testifies in regard to the sale of half a corn-mill by Richard Dummer, of Newbury, to John Pearson, of Rowley. [Ibid, 6:9.]
March 29, 1664. He gave in his deposition before Robert Lord, clerk, in regard to the settlement of the estate of "Ann Lum the mother of John Pickard." [Ibid, 2:197.]
In the Town Books of Rowley, it is recorded, that WILLIAM STICKNEY was buried January 25, 1664-5. He left a will, the original of which is still preserved (folded and filed) in the Essex Probate Office at Salem. Proved in court held at Ipswich, the 28 of March, 1665, by the oath of Maximilion Jewett and Samuel Brocklebanke.

ELIZABETH STICKNEY survived her husband several years, as appears by a deposition on file at the Essex Probate Office, and recorded in the Essex Registry of Deeds, Book 4, p. 228.
"The deposition of Elizabeth Stickney aged about 70 and Samuell Stickney aged about 45 yeares who testifieth that James Barker senior promised upon condition of marriage between his sonn James Barker and Mary the daughter of William Stickney deceased, that he the s'd James Barker senr. would give his sonn James a portion equall with any of his other children, his eldest son only excepted and neither before nor in his last will hath p'formed (performed) same & further saith not. Sworne in Court held at Ipswich the 24 of September 1678. as attest Robert Lord, Cler."

The date of her death is not known.

On the two hundredth anniversary of the death of WILLIAM STICKNEY, a granite obelisk was erected on his grave bearing the following inscription:


WILLIAM STICKNEY,
BORN IN
FRAMPTON, ENGLAND
A. D. 1592,
WAS, WITH HIS WIFE
ELIZABETH
OF BOSTON, IN N. E. IN 1638
OF ROWLEY IN 1639
WHERE HE DIED
A. D. 1665.

ERRECTED
BY HIS DESCENDANTS
JOSIAH STICKNEY
OF BOSTON
MATTHEW ADAMS STICKNEY
OF SALEM
JOSEPH HENRY STICKNEY
OF BALTIMORE MD.
1865."
He was married to * Elizabeth in England.(2728)

3649. * Elizabeth (2729) was born about 1608 in England. (2730) She emigrated in 1637 from Hull, Yorkshire Co., England. (2731) *Stickney Family: "Mr. Savage, in his Genealogical Dictionary, gives his "having come probably the year preceding, from Hull, in Yorkshire," that is in 1637, which is probably correct, as the first information obtained of him here, is from the records of the First Church in Boston, the Rev. John Wilson's, to which were admitted:
"The 6t of ye 11th moneth 1638"
She immigrated in 1637 to Boston, MA.(2732) *Stickney Family: "Mr. Savage, in his Genealogical Dictionary, gives his "having come probably the year preceding, from Hull, in Yorkshire," that is in 1637, which is probably correct, as the first information obtained of him here, is from the records of the First Church in Boston, the Rev. John Wilson's, to which were admitted:
"The 6t of ye 11th moneth 1638" She died after SEP 24 1678. (2733) see general notes. She probably died in Rowley, MA. She is my 9th great grandmother. 9th great grandmother

*Stickney Family: "At what time WILLIAM STICKNEY married, the surname of his wife, where he resided in England, and the date of the births or baptisms of his children, the name of the ship in which he embarked, as tradition says, at Hull, or the time of his arrival in Boston, New England, have not been ascertained." .....

"He and his wife Elizabeth and three children, Samuel, Amos and Mary (who were probably baptized in England), were among the original settlers of Rowley, Mass." ....

"ELIZABETH STICKNEY survived her husband several years, as appears by a deposition on file at the Essex Probate Office, and recorded in the Essex Registry of Deeds, Book 4, p. 228.
"The deposition of Elizabeth Stickney aged about 70 and Samuell Stickney aged about 45 yeares who testifieth that James Barker senior promised upon condition of marriage between his sonn James Barker and Mary the daughter of William Stickney deceased, that he the s'd James Barker senr. would give his sonn James a portion equall with any of his other children, his eldest son only excepted and neither before nor in his last will hath p'formed (performed) same & further saith not. Sworne in Court held at Ipswich the 24 of September 1678. as attest Robert Lord, Cler."

The date of her death is not known."
Children were:

child1824 i. * Amos Stickney.